Turkey 315: Cultural sayings, session 2


It was my husband’s idea to continue this segment of Turkey Lessons indefinitely, and I will probably make a new sub-category for it. This idea arose when I was listening to the song Bangır Bangır by Gülşen.  Fair warning- great song, crap video IMO.  If I wanted to watch scantily clad ladies twerking, I’d watch an American video.  But that’s just me ;)

Anyway, I listened to the song, filled in the lyrics, and found a few things I didn’t understand the translation of.  That’s when hubby said that I should put such things on my blog, that many other (american) English speakers may run into these cultural differences as well.  Here are three that he had to explain to me (two are from the song- do you hear them?)

Gül gibi- like a rose

Turkish meaning: something that is nice/enjoyable/lovely.  For example, if hubby is watching a movie and I come in and bother him, he may say to me “Babe, I was watching this movie gül gibi…why are you bothering me?”

American meaning:  Like a rose also means lovely, but usually we refer only to women in that way. You can’t perform an action that is “like a rose” in (american) english, unless you are being quite directly figurative.  E.g. She pricked me, like a rose.  Meaning, the girl is likely both beautiful and also “thorny” in her actions.  Turkish isn’t limited to such direct meanings.

Havalanmak- to hover

Turkish meaning: Besides actual hovering, figuratively hovering means to have an elevated sense of self worth. Be stuck up/ full of one’s self.

American meaning: Again, besides the literal meaning, hovering usually means to stick close to someone.  A lot of times this is used to intimate that the hovering person either doesn’t trust the person who they are hovering over (in romantic relationships), or they are very controlling/worrying (parents).

Güven vermek- to give trust

This one is particularly confusing for me, because the use of this verb is opposite in American English and Turkish. For the sake of the explanation, let’s refer to the person who is actively trusting as the truster, and the person who is being trusted is the trustee (because objects, direct objects, etc are just no fun).

Turkish meaning:  In Turkish, the trustee “gives trust” to the truster.  Effectively meaning that giving trust, in Turkish, means doing something that indicates trusting the trustee is a good idea. E.g. I  give trust to my manager when I give them a full write up of the project.

American meaning:  In American English, however, it is the truster who gives trust to the trustee. Normally in English you can get away with simply saying they “trust” rather than “give trust”, but you can say “give” to make the sentiment stronger. E.g. Your friend must give you a lot of trusttrust you a lot if she co-signs your apartment with you.

So,  hopefully, I will have many sessions of Turkey 315: cultural sayings in the future.  Let me know if you like this idea!  As I said before, figuring out how to speak culturally rather than directly translating is one of the key (and hardest) parts of becoming fluent in a language.  Drop a comment below if you have a few cultural sayings you’ve figured out that you want to include!

Ayva: Winter’s Surprise!


 And here I thought the fruit season had finished…

  Have you ever had quince?  If you are from the south eastern US, you probably haven’t.  It’s called ayva in Turkey, and it’s season is the fall/winter.  Four years ago I stared longingly at the ayva tree in our garden, desiring to try its fruits.  However, since we only stayed for the summer, it wasn’t my nasip at the time.

  But now, now it’s time!

quince on a white background

stolen from google :)

Ayva surprised me with how astringent it is, nearly sucking the moisture right out of my mouth.  I like it…but I love it as a jam!  Another sign of the change in season, ayva reçel is undoubtedly boiling on the stove of many Turks right now.  Spiced with cinnamon and (sometimes) clove, this jam reminds me of the US fall flavors I’ve been looking for.  This jam is particularly easy in that the seeds produce all of the gelatinous qualities you would normally need pectin for!



5-6 quince, peeled, cored, and grated


approx. 5c of sugar

1 stick cinnamon

1 tsp clove (optional)

quince seeds


1. Prepare a small pouch from a cheese cloth, old scarf, or another fine fabric- and place the quince seeds inside.

2. Put the quince in a pot with the seed pouch, covering them with water. Boil until the water is reduced by approx. half and the fruit is soft.

3. Add the sugar to the mix and melt it in.  Add the spices.

4.  Allow the mixture to simmer until it turns pink.  The concoction will still be liquidy.

5. Pour into glass jars hot, allowing them to cool with their tops off.   Once cooled, it will solidify.


‘Tis the Season to Make Aşure


As the onslaught of winter holidays are preparing to commence in the US, Turkey has a few unofficial holidays of their own.  While you may be spying colored leaf decor, pilgrim hats, and probably a few Christmas trees, in the states…in Turkey you will be seeing tons and tons of aşure!


Aşure (Ah-shur-eh), or Noah’s Pudding, is a dessert that I personally adore.  Sweetened with both sugar and fruit, aşure is a sure sign of the changing season. At least, it is right now.

Along with being a dessert, this is also the nickname of the Muslim month of Muharram (the first month on the islamic calendar- which operates by the moon phases).  For this reason, the months change over time- so in 10 years we may be preparing aşure around Easter rather than Christmas!

asure ingredients

  But I digress.

This dessert comes from the ubiquitous story of Noah (or Nuh) and the flood.  While Muslims and Christians don’t necessarily agree on how big the flood was, we can all agree that there was a guy on a boat for quite some time.  At the end of that time, there was only so many ingredients available to prepare much of anything.  With what remained, Noah prepared aşure.  There is a lot of significance to this month that you can search for on your own, I’m sticking to the dessert!

When one prepares aşure, they prepare A LOT.  That’s because you share your dessert with the whole neighborhood!  Invite over your closest neighbors, say some prayers, read a little Quran, then eat!  Later, load up a tepsi (tray) with as many bowls as you can and distribute them to the neighbors on your block.  More likely than not, you have some coming your way as well!  Just last week we visited Amca and his family, their aşure flavored with orange and clove felt like being back in the states again.DSCN3030

My favorite part of eating/making aşure is that everyone does it differently. While the base is pretty much the same, how people chose to flavor it can vary. Some people put figs and apricots, others put orange and apple.  Rose water? why not. Clove? Bring it on.  And the toppings sprinkled on top are always a treat! It literally took us one entire day to prepare the toppings.  Cracking, blanching, toasting, and pulverizing your own almonds and walnuts is not an easy task. Oh, but the reward…asure toppings

Without further ado, here is our recipe for aşure.  It makes a huge stock pot worth, so if you don’t plan on sharing with a dozen people- feel free to cut down the recipe.  Change it as you like!  We prepared the beans the day before.



1kg whole bulgur wheat

2c dried chickpeas

2c dried great northern beans

2c rice

1kg sugar

3 apples, peeled and diced

3 mandarine orange rinds, diced finely

1-2c raisins

2tsp cloves

1tbsp rose water

hot water



toasted sesame

toasted almonds, pulverized

toasted walnuts, pulverized

pomegranate seeds

toasted pine nuts




1.Soak the dried beans separately for several hours until ready to cook. Add a generous hand-full of salt to the water.

2. Wash the bulgur wheat very well*, then cook in a pressure cooker until done.

3. Remove the bulgur and place in a large stock pot. Cook the chickpeas in the pressure cooker until soft.

4. Cook the beans and rice separately in standard pots, until soft.

5. Put all of the legumes and grains, drained, in the same stock pot, add sugar. Meanwhile, boil the mandarin rind twice, removing any undesirable bitter flavors.

6. Fill stock pot with water until everything is submerged, plus two or three inches more.

7. Add the fruits/rind/clove and bring to a boil, letting everything mush together (its ugly but delicious). Add the rose water after boiling and stir it in.

8. Try and maintain a pourable consistency with hot water. Serve with garnish, hot.


*you know, go ahead and wash everything well.  EVERYTHING. Even the raisins.  Any residual color compounds can make your dessert ugly and discolored!



If you guys have been following my instagram, you probably have seen a lot of this little guy

I was going for beachy, since I’ve been missing the warm weather just a bit…but the shades kinda pushed it over to thug.  Well, that’s what hubby says.  I am limited in my marker using abilities, ok!?

His name is peanut (aka p-nizzle), and he’s been with us since we lived in Clemson, SC.  He goes with me everywhere- from SC, to FL, and now here.  When we went to the beach house, he rode with me in my bag.  He’s kind of like our baby.

One day while shopping in Hobby Lobby (a large arts and crafts store, if you don’t know) about 3 or so years ago for…something… There was a display of those (at the time) new “bug eyed” looking beanie babies.  I instantly fell in love with them!  Initially I had been playing with a tiger one (attending Clemson, you know. Go Tigers!), but hubby (at the time fiancee) picked up the elephant.

Do you want one?

I want the tiger!

But the elephant is cute.

Ok ok, if you say so

It took me about 2 seconds of holding the elephant in the check out line to make me fall in love with him.  Later on he adopted a nazar boncuk earring and a bracelet collar.  Now we are inseparable.

So if you were wondering, that’s where peanut came from :)

My First Fall in Turkey!


I love fall/winter!  There is something about slipping into a cozy sweater that makes you all warm and fuzzy inside.   It is particularly gratifying when you are a hijabi, because it gives you plenty of opportunities to layer different patterns and textures without getting too hot.  This is my first fall season in Turkey, and I am getting to have many new experiences, which I will blog about soon!  However, I will be missing out on the onslaught of American/Christian holidays that are right around the corner…#expatprobs


What do you love about Fall?

The Best Laid Plans


If you guys remember my post from three months ago, when we first got to Turkey, our trip from the US was anything but easy.  Having missed our initial connection in Germany due to a bad weather delay in the US, we had a long layover and arrived in Turkey at 1am.  What should have been a 2 “day” (including time changes) trip with an arrival at 2pm on Day 2 turned into a 3 “day”trip with a 1am arrival.  And if you don’t recall, my husband is borderline phobic of planes.  It went a little something like this:


Needless to say, I’m not exactly looking forward to my first visit back to the states… the best laid plans, am I right?

Turkey 350: Driving in Turkey


Before getting into the nitty gritty of driving in Turkey, let me share with you the one golden rule I’ve gleaned for (particularly) Americans who are preparing themselves for navigating the roads of Turkey.


Just don’t

Find another way.  Any other way than driving yourself.  It is just…it’s not okay.  My American heart cannot handle being a passenger in Turkey, let alone a driver.  I have navigated the nonstop traffic of Atlanta, GA., drove from SC to Washington DC, and I have never seen madness like driving in Turkey.  If you want to have the experience for yourself…here are some tips that have for you.


Traffic Lights

One of the things I actually do like about the roads in Turkey are the traffic lights. In America we are familiar with the (usually overhead) lights that show up as green for go, changes to yellow as a warning, then red for stop.  In Turkey, however, things are a bit different.  Here, you get yellow on both changes.  For example, the light will be green.  That green will then begin to blink when it is about to change.  That blinking green will then hold and the yellow light will light up simultaneously. Both will turn off when red lights up.  When the red is about to change, it will also light up yellow simultaneously then go to green.  I actually really like this system because I have a phobia of traffic lights.  I can never be sure of my “point of no return”, and sometimes I will end up hard breaking at a yellow or running a red.  So this idea of dual, long warnings is really quite pleasant.


Stop Signs

Do not be confused.  The red hexagonal signs that say “DUR” do not mean “Do whatever you like”.  They actually mean stop.  However, these road signs are predominantly used for decoration and you can feel free to ignore them.  Everyone else does.



The pretty white lines on the pavement are also for decoration.  These do not signify lane rules, per se, more like lane suggestions.  If you want to drive down the center of the road- straddling the nice white line- feel free to do so.  The traffic police won’t stop you.  In fact, if you want the full Turkish driving experience, I strongly suggest you do so.


One way/ multi way roads

There are one way roads in Turkey, as there are in most places.  However, these one way roads used to be two way roads, until people decided to park along both sides of it.  Now it is a one way road, and that way is whichever way the bigger car is going at the time.  Feel like playing chicken with a truck? Be my guest!  There are also one way roads that are indicated as such by signs…Im still not sure if those are decoration or not.  Also, feel free to stop on the side of a busy street for no good reason.  That also seems to be ok.  Just drive over the line decoration in the middle of the road to get around them at your leisure.



Sidewalks are differently paved roads for both cars and pedestrians.  Speaking of which…


Pedestrians simultaneously have the right of way all of the time, and none of the time.  If you try to cross the street, people will try and run you over- regardless of if you have the walk sign or not.  If you are trying to drive down a four lane road- someone is going to try to walk in front of you.

Speed Limits

Finally, something similar to the US.  Speed limits, similarly, are treated as speed suggestions.  However, it appears that the traffic police are okay with that in some places.  We’ve even sped around the traffic police themselves and were not stopped.

So that is Turkish Traffic School as I know it.  There are no rules, basically, just do whatever you feel like.  Honestly, in America we follow most traffic rules very strictly and they are also very much enforced.  In Turkey, it seems, that no rules are followed and no one cares.   There must be a middle ground somewhere…maybe Switzerland.

Good luck!

Baby Steps AKA: What sucks (initial months)


The full title of this post should be “Baby Steps AKA: What sucks about moving to a country that doesn’t speak your language (the initial three months experience)”, but I thought that would be way too bulky a title and clutter up my blog space.

I know I’ve been singing the praises of Turkey and showing all of the good times I’ve been having (the best that I can while remaining anonymous), but there are some difficulties to moving to a new country…particularly one where the main language is not your own (or close to it- but the alphabet is almost the same so I guess that’s a win).  I like to think of the “learning curve” I’ve been experiencing as baby steps…both, because you learn things slowly and in small pieces, and because I feel like I’m two years old.


There are so many aspects of living in Turkey that I didn’t even think of that could become a hurdle for me to overcome.  Going from 25 years old and managing my own house (apartment…shack…cardboard box.) and holding down a job/academic career to being basically a child who can’t work or speak or really do much of anything without assistance is quite difficult.  No, it’s freaking hard. FRICKIN’ HARD (read with a southern accent).

These are a few things that I have been having to learn from the beginning. AGAIN.


Honestly, this is a no brainer, and I was pretty prepared for it.  I knew that there was going to be a language barrier- especially when it comes to speaking culturally.  Even with the vocabulary and grammar understanding of a five year old, I’m managing alright.  The hardest part, really, is that some things don’t translate directly from English to Turkish.  For example-  you don’t take a picture, you pull a picture.  Yeah, I know it seems so weird- but if hubby can overcome these obstacles going from Turkish to English, I can too!


If you have perused my recipe tag at all, you will know that I am no novice in the kitchen.  I’m not a supreme chef, but I can cook.  However, everything in Turkey is different.  I’m really struggling to adjust to propane ranges rather than electric.  When I first came, I was scared to even turn the things on.  I lean slightly towards being a pyrophobe- no thanks to the ubiquitous stories we are told as children of people burning their faces off with propane tanks/stoves, in an attempt to make us careful.  If you don’t know what I’m talking about, then I’m sorry, but your parents don’t love you.

Along with the methods of cooking, the spices, I swear, are different.  Is there an enhancer in American salt? I know I should know this already since I’m a food science major- but I focused more on microbiology than production.  Here, I have to use a pound of salt where I used to use a pinch (slightly hyperbolic, but it feels that way). Also, most of the spices Anne uses are freshly ground, so the taste is different.

I used to be able to cook up a breakfast, lunch, and dinner like a pro- but now…I poke around and help where I can.  And some people here are picky… Sometimes, I feel useless.


Even the washing machines here were a conundrum to me! They are not the same!  If you are accustomed to a front loading washing machine with buttons for temp/cycles/ etc then you would be fine- but I’m a good ol’ southern gal who uses top loaders with a dial.  While I have now gotten the hang of the washing machine- it is still something Anne does most of the time, because I just don’t know what I’m doing…

And also, drying machines aren’t a thing.  I think this is the case for most of Europe though.  Did you know there is a technique to hanging clothes on a line? Yeah, I didn’t either.  I’m still trying to figure that out.

Those are just a few things for now.  Grocery shopping, hosting, and cleaning the house are a few others that I haven’t written here…maybe another post.  I often feel like a burden on the family- like a useless little girl that doesn’t know how to be an adult.  Especially since brides/daughters play a big role in the upkeep of the house. I really can’t explain how hard it is to go from a card carrying adult to a child.  I really can’t. It’s just something you have to experience.

Fortunately, I have a very patient mother-in-law who doesn’t hesitate to help me, and also accepts my poor attempts at assistance when I offer them.

#expat problems

Turkey 315: Cultural Phrases and Sayings


Every language has its “cultural” sayings.  Things that don’t necessarily make sense when taken literally upon translation.  An example of an English (particularly American) cultural saying is- “get a kick out of that”, meaning something is funny.  Turkish has a LOT of cultural sayings.  They make perfect sense when you have adjusted your ears and mind to Turkish, but when first getting off the plane…you may get a little lost.  I have listed several sayings that I hear frequently, that I had trouble with, and that are just plain fun to say!

Much like in America, religion has a bit of an influence on cultural sayings.  However, even atheists can use some of the more “religious” sayings and not feel out of place.  Even if you aren’t Muslim or necessarily religious, feel free to use all of these!

And just to make pronunciation easier, if you don’t already know them…these are the Turkish letters you will see, and their sounds

Ş- sh (as in shoot)

Ç-ch (as in change)

Ü- ew (with a Cartman sound from south park)(no real translation to an english sound, but close enough)

Ğ- eh (as if swallowing)

ö- oo (as in spook)

You know, this really hard to explain by typing… maybe you should go with a good old youtube search.

In Good Times, and In Bad

Hayırlı olsun- congratulations, but in a slightly religious/ blessed way. –

You got the job? Hayirlı olsun! :)

Hayırlısı olsun- that’s unfortunate, It’s up to God

You didn’t get the job? Hayirlısı olsun…:(

Allah (çok) şukur- Thank God (very much)

You made it home safely, allah şukur!

Aferin- good job

You made a 100 on your test? Aferin!

Coming and Going

Hoş geldin- welcome (you came nice)

*when opening the door to guests* Hoş geldin!

Hoş bulduk- the response to hoş geldin (we found you nice)

*cheek kisses are exchanged* hoş bulduk!

Görüşürüz- see you later! For friends/relatives

*upon leaving* Görüşürüz!

Hoşça kal- Good bye (stay nicely), more formal

*upon leaving* Hoşça kal!

In Sickness and In Health

(Gelmiş) Geçmiş olsun- a wish for a sick person to get well, or for someone who is struggling with something to get through it (translates to: (it came), let it pass)

I heard you have a cold, geçmiş olsun

You have been going through a hard time lately, geçmiş olsun

Sıhatlar olsun- say after someone has taken a shower/ got a haircut/ cut their nails, etc. More popular amongst the older generation (a wish for good health)

Sıhatlar olsun! That haircut looks nice on you.

Şıfa olsun- another wish for health, usually associated with eating something healthy or taking medicine

Drink this tea, şıfa olsun!

Food and Gifts

Eline/ellerine/elinize/ellerinize sağlık- Wishing health to the hands of a person.  Complimenting a chef or artist/worker (e.g. delicious food, a beautiful painting, a well-designed door, etc). The reason this one has many / options is due to pluralizing and formalizing, which is a grammar thing I won’t get into unless asked ;)

This food is delicious, eline sağlık!

Afiyet olsun- the Turkish version of bon apetit (enjoy it), also used as a response to elini sagolik.

This food is delicious, eline sağolik!

Afiyet olsun.

Güle güle kullan- Said to someone who received a new…thing…for using. Anything but clothes, really. (Use it well!)

*gives a new power tool* güle güle kullan!

Güle güle gi- said to someone who received new clothes (Wear it well!)

I love your new jacket, güle güle gi!

Of course, this list is nowhere near complete! To be honest, I probably haven’t even heard all of the different cultural sayings that Turks use.  While this is the hardest part of learning a new language/ being an expat, it is also the part that makes you feel most connected to your new home- once you start to learn it.

Drop a comment below with more sayings, or instances where you used one of these correctly/ wrong!

Until next time, Görüşürüz!

Turkey 650: Turkish Family Residency Permit-How To!


Today, after weeks of preparation, we finally went to the immigration office in Izmir to turn in my documents for my residency permit.  Alhamdulillah and Allah cok sukur, we got it right the first try!  Let me tell you right now, so many people/websites/officials told us different things- that I was very concerned about succeeding in this endeavor.  Several friends told me about their struggles of getting a work permit for Turkey, and that really had me wondering if I would be ok.  Well, here I am, with a successfully completed Family Residency Permit!  It appears as though being married to a Turk makes a huuuuuge difference when it comes to the residency permit process.

I really wish someone would have told me straight how the process went…so now I am going to tell you!

Keep in mind that every situation is different- and these are a few of the things that made our situation unique:

  1. I am American, my husband is Turkish
  2. We have been married 2.5 years, so citizenship eligibility is right around the corner
  3. Hubby is awaiting assignment to his job by the government- he isn’t just jobless
  4. We went EVERYWHERE for these things together, and with his dad.  I feel like having a “team” helps the process
  5. We applied and completed everything in Izmir
  6. I have no criminal record

If I were a Cuban male, married for five minutes, and applying in Kayseri by myself- would things be different? I have NO idea.  That’s why I want to really impress upon you that what I did and what worked for me may not work for you.  But this is how it went….

 What you need:

4 photographs of you, within the last 6 months, BIOMETRIC (Biometrik)

1 photo of your spouse, BIOMETRIC

Your passport, and a photo copy

Your spouse’s Turkish ID and photo copy

Proof of 24k TL from the bank, in your spouse’s name (from the day of your application)

Proof of Turkish insurance

Your Turkish marriage licence

Proof of Turkish residency for your spouse

Your vergi (tax) number

Your entry visa

$145 (in TL, at the exchange rate of the day) and 55TL

What is a family residency permit?

The family residency permit is intended for allowing the spouse (and children) of a Turkish citizen to remain in the country for 2 years.  The 2 years is kind of pre-determined.  Whether or not you can make it less, I am not sure.  However, I am pretty sure that you can’t make it more than 2 years on the first application.  This is my understanding.  I went for the 2 years permit even though I am eligible for citizenship in a few months, because that citizenship process takes forever- and it is better to be safe than sorry.  A friend of mine recently applied for citizenship based on bloodline, around 3 months ago, and she is still waiting for approval.

The good side is that it seems like the easiest/ cheapest permit to obtain. On the bad side, you don’t have the right to work.

Biometric photos

We obtained our biometric photos from a “foto kent”. Biometric is basically just a face close up with a white background.  I was scarved and also wore some makeup- but nothing crazy (a bit of blusher, eyeliner, light eye shadow, and filled in eyebrows). If you look like someone else, they may not accept it.  No problem with being covered though. Ask for a digital copy- it will make filling out your online application form a lot easier.

Passport/ Turkish ID

I think this is pretty straight forward.  Make sure you copy the page with your info and picture on it.  Turkish IDs need both sides copied.

Proof of money

The proof of money was also a lot simpler than I though it would be!  You simply go to the bank and ask for the proof from your Turkish citizen spouse’s account. It will be signed by the bank worker on duty.  If you have your account in dollars rather than TL, ask the bank associate to include a statement of what the value of the dollars would be that day, in TL.  That worked for us- but if someone at the immigration office is having a bad day, they may not accept it.  Fair warning.  ***IT IS CRITICAL THAT YOU OBTAIN THIS FORM THE DAY OF YOUR APPOINTMENT

You can spend it all after you’re done ;)

Proof of insurance

Ok, this is where the situation becomes uniquely married.  That is, I am covered under my husband’s SGK- national health coverage.  If you just got here, you will have to pay a fee for it (unless it is after the elections on Nov 1, 2015 when you read this- then I have no idea).  There is a form to obtain from the SGK office, and something to print off from online to prove you are covered.  Bring it all.  Heck, we even got a special form from the SGK office with my name on it saying I am covered too, just to be safe.

No need to buy private insurance when you are married ;).

The first lady we saw at the SGK office told us that we had to get all of these forms to prove that we just arrived in Turkey and had been in the US previously.  What a headache.  We asked someone else, and they said a stamped passport was enough.  This is a GREAT example of how things in Turkey sometimes depend on the person you talk to.

Turkish marriage license

If you got married outside of Turkey as we did, you would have to file your marriage with the Turkish consulate.  You will receive the aile cuzdani (marriage license).  We did this the week after we married. YOU NEED THIS. If you haven’t done it yet- do it now!

Spousal residency

Again, as we just arrived, we had to go to some building that said nufus on it…don’t ask, this was when we just got here about 2 months ago, and have hubbys father sign a paper saying that hubby was living in Turkey again.  You are going to need that form.

Vergi/tax number

When you are a non-citizen who wants to have a bank account or do something financial with the Turkish government, you need a tax number.  You will be able to get this with your passport at your local Vergi Dairesi.  It takes a few days for the system to register you, so do this early.  You need this number to pay your fee.

Entry visa

THIS is something that took me FOREVER and a lot of STRESS to find out.  If you are coming into Turkey and intend to get a family residency permit.. you can enter on an E-VISA/tourist with no problems!  Everywhere I looked it said E-VISAs can only be used for short term residency permits.  Well, that was a big fat lie.  You can get your visa for entry into Turkey as simple as click, click on the internet!  Bring a copy of the print out when you go to the appointment.

$145/ 55TL fee

This is where we hit our snag today.  The fee for a 2 year family permit is pretty low compared to others, that I have heard.  Is this because Im American or because it is a family permit? I have no idea. But that was the fee.  PLEASE note, so you don’t make our mistake, the $145 should be paid in TURKISH LIRA according to the exchange rate of THAT DAY.  You will pay at the vergi daire that is closest to your immigration office.  Bring two photocopies of your receipt!

The application form

The application form is pretty standard and easy to answer.  YOUR permanent address should be the one in your home country.  You only have to answer the questions in red.  The area that was confusing for us was the “supporter’s work/income” section.  Because we had the proof of funds, we simply put 1000TL for the income, because you are basically showing 2 years of minimum wage when you show the 24K TL in the bank.  I don’t know if this could be a problem for someone who is NOT waiting for a gov’t job. As hubby understood it, if you have the cash in the bank- the income is not important. Either way, it worked out.  Also, I filled out and sent in this form the day before the appointment (because that’s all we had open).  I heard that if your visa runs out while you await your permit appointment that it’s ok…but I don’t like pushing the limits.

I want to stress- very much stress- HIGHLIGHT, UNDERLINE, and BOLD:

everyone and everywhere is different

It is unfortunate that, as I have come to realize, everything can be made more difficult when someone is in a mood.  If the bank teller doesn’t like you, they may not give you a form stating turkish lira and dollars. If the vergi daire person doesn’t like you, your form could take longer to process.  If the immigration office person thinks your hair needs work, they can say your insurance proof is insufficient and you need more documentation. That is Turkey.  Sure, if you complain you can probably get around all that nonsense- but it is a head ache none the less.

If you have any other insights for different countries/ cities/ situations, please send me a message or drop a comment below to help out the others in your situation!